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Bike companies caught in Brexit crossfire

Canyon Neuron action
(Image credit: Canyon)

As the United Kingdom and European Union negotiated a post-Brexit trade deal, shipments of bikes to UK soil were impacted for at least two brands. 

Rose Bikes announced that they will cease orders to the UK because of Brexit. As was originally reported by BikeRadar, UK customers will receive their order from Rose Bikes if it was shipped by December 20. All orders not shipped by that date will be canceled, and the German company will not accept any additional UK orders. 

“Unfortunately we feel compelled to not fulfill UK orders currently,” said a statement on the company’s website. “We hope to be able to ship to our UK customers soon again.” 

Rose isn’t the only company pausing shipments of bikes. Canyon has announced on their website that shipments to the UK will be temporarily paused. 

“Due to the uncertainty and potential bottlenecks at the border, we are temporarily halting shipment of all bikes from 19th December until at least 11th January,” the statement says. 

Canyon Bicycles said they will still take orders from Dec. 19 to Jan. 11, but orders will not ship until after Jan. 11. E-bike orders may be further impacted due to the batteries being classified as a dangerous good. Canyon will also halt all orders to Northern Ireland, and wrote that they are working on a solution for customers there. 

Canyon’s statement also mentioned that despite Brexit, all duties and tariffs will be included in the price of the bike, so the process of ordering and receiving a bike from the company will remain the same. 

The UK and EU reached a deal on Dec. 24, just days before the Dec. 31 deadline. Now, goods traveling between the two entities will not be subject to the tariffs. If a deal was not struck, prices would have been impacted. 

In 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union. Then, the UK officially left the Union in early 2020 and entered into a transition period to negotiate the details of the split. Since all EU member states are subject to the same trade regulations, the UK was forced to come up with its own trade regulations with the EU and countries around the world.