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Salsa Regulator Ti seatpost review

Salsa’s gorgeous-looking, curved-shaft Regulator Ti promises to be the ultimate, comfort-boosting adventure seatpost. Does it deliver?

Salsa Regulator Ti
(Image: © Guy Kesteven)

Our Verdict

Beautifully designed head on a curved titanium shaft makes the Regulator Ti a shock-soothing joy to use if the single size fits but it’s heavier and pricier than other carbon and titanium alternatives

For

  • - Smoothed ride
  • - Separated saddle clamp and tilt
  • - Should be super durable
  • - Premium aesthetics

Against

  • - Heavy
  • - Expensive
  • - Proper tightening is crucial
  • - Round saddle rails only
  • - 27.2mm diameter
  • - Zero offset discontinued

Bike Perfect Verdict

Beautifully designed head on a curved titanium shaft makes the Regulator Ti a shock-soothing joy to use if the single size fits but it’s heavier and pricier than other carbon and titanium alternatives

Pros

  • + - Smoothed ride
  • + - Separated saddle clamp and tilt
  • + - Should be super durable
  • + - Premium aesthetics

Cons

  • - - Heavy
  • - - Expensive
  • - - Proper tightening is crucial
  • - - Round saddle rails only
  • - - 27.2mm diameter
  • - - Zero offset discontinued

Salsa’s Regulator Ti seatpost is something of a cult item among bikepackers looking for epic durability and extra comfort. Plus it’s a lovely piece to use and look at. However when push comes to shove, weight, compatibility and cost comparisons with best mountain bike seatpost alternatives aren’t so forgiving.

Design and aesthetics

Image 1 of 2

Salsa Regulator Ti

The clamp head is a thing of simple beauty, too (Image credit: Guy Kesteven)
Image 2 of 2

Salsa Regulator Ti

It uses an internal wedge system to lock the alloy clamp pieces into the transverse titanium tube (Image credit: Guy Kesteven)

There used to be several curved shaft seatpost options, but Salsa’s Regulator Ti is one of the few remaining. You’ll either love or hate the curved look (which likely depends on the lines of the frame it’s being added to) and it definitely works better on compact/MTB-style frames where more of the extra-long 410mm shaft is free to flex. 

The clamp head is a thing of simple beauty, too, using an internal wedge system to lock the infinitely angle-adjustable alloy clamp pieces into the transverse titanium tube welded onto the shaft. The saddle clamps then bolt on from the outside for a super clean look that separates saddle security and tilt setting, but still allows the latter to be altered without loosening the saddle. 

Specifications and performance

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Salsa Regulator Ti

It's easy to see why Salsa’s Regulator Ti seatpost is something of a cult item among bikepackers (Image credit: Guy Kesteven)
Image 2 of 2

Salsa Regulator Ti

A deconstructed view of the clamping mechanism (Image credit: Guy Kesteven)

Looks aside, the thin-walled 3.25 AL/V titanium alloy tube adds a noticeable amount of buoyant spring between your butt and your bike. 

Stainless steel hardware means you can put the required 6-8Nm of torque into the bolts without worrying about shearing something or slipping. You will need to keep an eye on that tension on the first few rides though, particularly if you have a habit of bouncing in the saddle through compressions and/or you’re using a long and heavily loaded seat pack.

On the downside, the long shaft and luxury design of the Regulator comes at a significant cost in terms of weight and money, even compared to other premium options. It’s 39g heavier than Thomson’s slightly more expensive inline titanium post, 88g heavier than Zipp’s similarly comfort-tuned carbon shaft Service Course SL that’s $115 / £119 cheaper and 105g heavier than USE’s $75 / £130 cheaper Duro Titanium. Those alternatives come in several diameter options and are compatible with carbon and oval rail saddles, too, while the Salsa only comes in a 27.2mm diameter, round rail format. It’s 85g heavier than Canyon’s radical split shaft VCLS seat post that’s $TBC / £71 cheaper, too.

Verdict

With classic, retro looks, a really clever seat clamp (presuming you tighten it enough) and a noticeably smoothed saddle experience, if you’ve got enough shaft exposed we can see why the Regulator Ti has devoted fans, particularly in the adventure riding community. However, we can’t deny that there are cheaper, lighter titanium and carbon options that give a similar ride and fit more bikes and saddles.

Tech Specs: Salsa Regulator Ti seatpost

  • Price: $275 / £275
  • Weight: 319g
  • Sizes: 27.2 x 410mm
Guy Kesteven

Guy Kesteven is Bike Perfect and Cyclingnews’ contributing tech editor. Hatched in Yorkshire he's been hardened by riding round it in all weathers since he was a kid. He got an archaeology degree out of Exeter University, spent a few years digging about in medieval cattle markets, working in bike shops and warehouses before starting writing and testing for bike mags in 1996. Since then he’s written several million words about several thousand test bikes and a ridiculous amount of riding gear. To make sure he rarely sleeps and to fund his custom tandem habit he’s also coughed out a handful of bike-related books and talks to a GoPro for YouTube, too. We trust Guy's opinion and think you should, too.


Rides: Pace RC295, Cotic FlareMax, Specialized Chisel Ltd MTBs, Vielo V+1 gravel bike, Cannondale Supersix Evo Dura-Ace Di2 Disc road bike, Nicolai FS Enduro, Landescape custom gravel tandem

Height: 180cm

Weight: 69kg