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POC Coron Air SPIN full-face helmet review

First Look: It may not be the lightest or airiest full-face lid, but POC's Coron Air helmet has got a lot of promise as a very wearable all-rounder

What is a hands on review?
POC Coron Air SPIN full-face helmet in profile placed on a wooden stump
(Image: © Sean Fishpool)

Early Verdict

POC’s downhill and enduro helmet matches clean looks with robust construction and some innovative design approaches

For

  • Multi-impact EPP construction
  • Innovative SPIN alternative to MIPS
  • Extra custom fit pads supplied
  • Easy breathing and hearing
  • Clean looks

Against

  • Average weight

It seems like every manufacturer wants to describe their best mountain bike helmets - regardless of discipline - as all-day comfortable, and that was POC’s aim with the Coron Air SPIN. The Swedish company wanted to combine proper full-face protection with wearability that would make this a go-to helmet for long enduro riders as well as downhill mountain biking.  

Have they achieved it? Largely, yes.

Construction

The clean, conservative looks of the POC Coron Air SPIN belie some innovative approaches from the Swedish manufacturer.

One standout feature is that under the outer fiberglass shell, the main shock-absorbing layer is made of expanded polypropylene (EPP) rather than the much more common expanded polystyrene (EPS). While the two materials look similar and provide protection by compressing, EPP doesn’t deform permanently under impact, which means that it can continue to provide protection after multiple impacts. 

Obviously, there’ll be a limit, and after a big crash or a crash with external damage to the helmet, you’ll probably want to replace it, but it takes away the worry that small, everyday dings will reduce the effectiveness of your lid.

Another way that POC do things differently is with SPIN. This is an interesting approach to reducing the rotational forces on the brain that the head could experience in an impact. Instead of having a slightly rotatable layer in the helmet like MIPS, the removable padding within the POC helmet contains silicone inserts. This means that even when the pads are compressed (as in a crash), one face of the pad can still rotate against the other. It also makes for really comfortable feeling pads and avoids the potential for creaking that some riders report with MIPS

Other safety features include a breakaway visor and an emergency cheek pad release.

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POC Coron Air SPIN full-face helmet three-quarter view

The clean lines of the Coron follow the typical POC styling guide (Image credit: Sean Fishpool)
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POC Coron Air SPIN full-face helmet full frontal

The peak has space for goggles to be stored and can break away in the event of a crash (Image credit: Sean Fishpool)
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POC Coron Air SPIN full-face helmet on its side showing straps and cushioning

Spin padding is comfortable and offer rotational protection in a crash (Image credit: Sean Fishpool)

Design and aesthetics

Even though the ventilation probably isn’t quite the standout feature that POC proclaims (due to limited vents and a fine mesh covering), the Coron Air SPIN promises to be a very livable-with helmet. The SPIN padding is really comfortable. There’s good space around the mouth to breathe, and the special design around the earpads does seem to help with hearing and reduce any sense of disorientation, as POC intended. 

As a bonus, removing the quick-release cheek pads for long climbs significantly increases ventilation, and you don’t even need to take the helmet off to do so.

The helmet plays particularly nicely with POC’s own ORA goggles and looks great too. Even though the visor isn’t adjustable, there’s plenty of space beneath it to store goggles when they’re not needed.

The Coron Air Spin comes with easily removable pads for washing and a set of smaller custom fit pads that can be fixed behind the main pads to tweak the fit wherever you need it. 

For everyday usability, the edges of the EPP inner are protected against abrasion, and the chin strap is secured with a regular plastic clip, which is quicker to use than D-rings, if possibly not quite as secure.

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POC Coron Air SPIN full-face helmet's frontal venting system and helmet peak

There is two vents on the forehead as well as channeling over the brow (Image credit: Sean Fishpool)
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POC Coron Air SPIN full-face helmet 's rear vents

The rear of the helmet features six vents, four on the back of the head and two on the top of the neck (Image credit: Sean Fishpool)
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A closer look at the POC Coron's chin strap and venting port

A large chin bar vent should help with breathing air flow (Image credit: Sean Fishpool)

Early verdict

The POC Coron Air Spin is an agreeable full-face helmet. It’s comfortable, with a great sense of protection and some innovative design and safety features, all at a reasonable price. Aesthetically its trademark POC with calculated shaping and clean lines, the look isn't as dividing as it once was although POC design has always appealed to us and the Coron is no different. POC offers the Coron Air Spin in three colors: Hydrogen White (as pictured), Actinium Pink/Uranium Black Matt and Moonstone Grey/Uranium Black Matt. 

If you’re feeling flush, there’s a carbon version too that’s $450/£400, shares the same ventilation and fit but shaves 100g off.

Tech Specs: POC Coron Air SPIN

  • Price: $275 / £260
  • Weight: 1,124g (size M-L)
  • Sizes:  3 (XS-S, M-L, XL-XXL)
  • Outer: Fiberglass
  • Inner: EPP (expanded polypropylene)
  • Vents: 18
  • Rotational protection: SPIN
  • Colors: 3

What is a hands on review?

'Hands on reviews' are a journalist's first impressions of a piece of kit based on spending some time with it. It may be just a few moments, or a few hours. The important thing is we have been able to play with it ourselves and can give you some sense of what it's like to use, even if it's only an embryonic view.