Best mountain bike goggles 2024 – top-rated models that provide clarity and protection on the trails

A rider wearing the best mountain bike goggles
(Image credit: Paul Brett)

The best mountain bike goggles will ensure unprecedented coverage and eye protection. They will also give a more secure fit when compared to the best mountain bike sunglasses. Sunglasses are generally a lighter and well-ventilated solution to eye protection. Still, for more gnarly and aggressive riding, goggles do a far better job when it comes to keeping your eyes safe and clear of trail debris.

Most of the best mountain bike helmets are designed to accommodate goggles and should fit securely around your helmet. The best MTB goggles will fit snuggly against the face using foam padding with no chance of shaking loose, no matter how rough the trails me be. The trade-off for the added protection is goggles can get hotter than sunglasses and aren't something you'll want to wear if you have a massive day with lots of climbing ahead. 

 Best mountain bike goggles

Why trust BikePerfect Our cycling experts have decades of testing experience. We'll always share our unbiased opinions on bikes and gear. Find out more about how we test.

The quick list

1. Best overall

POC Ora Clarity goggles placed on a flat stone surface

(Image credit: Dean Hersey)
Supremely comfortable MTB goggles

Specifications

Lens: Clarity

Reasons to buy

+
Flexible frame
+
Foam-free for trail and enduro ventilation
+
Wide field of view
+
Perfect clarity of Carl Zeiss lens

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks the versatility to support tear-offs out of the box

POC's Ora Clarity are the best overall in this best MTB goggles guide and has a host of design and performance features that meant they received a top rating from our tester – Dean Hersey. Dean said, "POC has done an incredible job balancing the main attributes required in an MTB goggle, offering up a perfect solution to eye protection for trail and enduro riders."

He also added that the Ora has a comfortable and wide frame, which gives an unobstructed field of view and the double-glazed lens from Zeiss boosts optical clarity.

The Oras come in two specs, a downhill version complete with pins for tear-offs, and a trail and enduro version with no pins or foam over the vents for maximum airflow.

Read the full review of the POC Ora Clarity for all the details.

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The lowdown: POC Ora Clarity
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceZeiss lens, impressive venting and wide field of view★★★★★
ComfortVery comfortable and the best fitting★★★★★
Color and customizationLimited choice could be better★★★
Value for moneyPriced well for the level of performance★★★★

2. Best for vision

Scott Prospect goggles review

(Image credit: Dean Hersey)
Obstruction-free vision

Specifications

Lens: Tinted and Clear

Reasons to buy

+
Huge range of view
+
Articulating strap outriggers 
+
Adjustment to fit all shapes and sizes of full-face helmets
+
Offer a good level of protection
+
Quality feel and finish

Reasons to avoid

-
Lens changes aren't easy
-
On the large side and look a tad funny with open face trail helmets
-
MX styling not for everyone

Scott claims the Prospect has one of the widest fields of view in the MTB goggles market and they use a curved lens to push the frame out past your peripheral vision.

On test, we found them to be almost too large, measuring 50mm taller than their predecessors – the Scott Hustle and they look slightly odd, especially with open-face trail helmets. However, the large sizes mean the Prospects offer a good level of protection, are easily adjusted to fit all shapes and sizes of full-face MTB helmets, and have a quality feel and finish.

Scott has also updated its Lens Lock system, which uses four locking pins that go through the lens to prevent it from popping out in a crash. Unfortunately, this system works a little too well, and lens swaps aren't the easiest.

Read our review of the Scott Prospect goggles for more information.

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The lowdown: Scott Prospect
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceHuge field of view and quality finish★★★★
ComfortMicrofiber foam layer is up there with the best★★★★★
Colors and customizationLoads of color options★★★★
Value for moneyPriced failry against rivals★★★★

3. Best for durability

Leatt Velocity 6.5 Goggles

(Image credit: Jim Bland)
Bulletproof MTB goggles

Specifications

Lens: Mirrored, Ultra Contrast, Clear

Reasons to buy

+
Supreme build quality
+
Huge amounts of protection
+
Impressive lens quality

Reasons to avoid

-
The generous levels cause some peripheral vision contamination

If out-and-out protection is your priority then the Leatt Velocity 6.5 goggles feature a legitimately bulletproof lens – the South African brand says the injection-molded lenses are bulletproof, meeting the US Military Ballistic Impact Standards. So they should handle anything the trail throws at you.

On review, Jim Bland was particularly happy with the "totally locked-in feel" and that the foam used by Leatt felt supportive and well-fitting. The deep fit also added a safe and secure feel when riding.

The lenses themselves are tear-off and roll-off ready, and Leatt supplies a pack of tear-offs which is unusual but great to see. Jim added that lens swaps were painless too.

Check out Jim's full review of the Leatt Velocity 6.5 goggles for all the details.

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The lowdown: Leatt Velocity 6.5
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceBullet proof lens with a solid durable build★★★★
ComfortSupportive and well-fitting★★★★
Colors and customizationLeatt offers 13 color options★★★★★
Value for moneyWell positioned on price point★★★★

4. Best ventilation

Smith Squad MTB goggles

(Image credit: Dean Hersey)
On-point optics and class-leading ventilation

Specifications

Lens: Chromapop, Clear

Reasons to buy

+
Great venting
+
Featherweight
+
Class-leading comfort

Reasons to avoid

-
Reflection on the inside from frame in this colorway
-
ChromaPop Sun Black tint is dark for British conditions

Smith claims to have tackled one of the big problems with MTB goggles – fogging. The Squad MTB frame features large ventilation ports that are spaced well around the entirety of the lens. Our tester was keen to point out that, "the open vents worked a treat, and kept condensation at bay" but, also stated, "the downside of such large ports was that occasionally, they allowed in small pieces of dust or mud."

The frame features a semi-frameless design and material has been kept to a minimum. The 'Fit construction' allows the goggle to distort and follow the contours and shape of any face.

If you're keen for more then read our full review of the Smith Squad MTB goggles for more details.

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The lowdown: Smith Squad MTB
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceNo fogging with plenty of vents and great lens★★★★
ComfortComfortable with a quality, secure fit★★★★
Colors and customizationLoads of choice ★★★★
Value for moneyPriced very nicely for performance★★★★

5. Best optical clarity

Koo Edge goggles

(Image credit: Jim Bland)
Brilliant clarity in all conditions

Specifications

Lens: Blue mirror, Clear, Pink mirror, Red mirror

Reasons to buy

+
Lens quality is truly exceptional
+
A removable nose guard is an effective addition
+
Lens removal is a cinch to work with

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive compared to other options on the market
-
The foam used lacks support and compromises comfort
-
Frequent fogging is a real issue

The lenses on the Koo Edge goggles are designed in partnership with the optical experts Zeiss. Therefore, they give maximum performance and clarity across a broad range of light conditions. There are multiple tint/color options and all of them are 100 percent UV protective. 

We found that the Koo Edge goggles offered some seriously impressive quality of vision and it genuinely feels like the HD effect boosts precision and line-choice accuracy on the trail. However, they are susceptible to fogging, and the foam used lacked support and compromised comfort.

Read our full review of the Koo Edge mountain bike goggles.

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The lowdown: Koo Edge
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceZeiss lens is great but occasional fogging★★★
ComfortFoam used could be better★★
Colors and customizationDecent with variety of color choices★★★★
Value for moneyFairly expensive considering performance★★★

6. Best for comfort

100% Armega goggles

(Image credit: Dean Hersey)
Loads of color matching options mixed with plenty protection and comfort

Specifications

Lens: Clear, Mirror, Vented Dual Pane

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent protection for your eyes
+
MOTO inspired comfort
+
Large field of view
+
Impressive range of colorways

Reasons to avoid

-
On the large and heavy side
-
Moto styling isn't for everyone
-
Expensive

The 100% Armega features a unique proprietary 'Climate Control' system, made up of a perforated triple-layer foam that draws sweat and moisture away from your face making them one of the most comfortable MTB goggles around.

Our tester Dean Hersey noted that the Armega fitted perfectly with most of the best full-face MTB helmets around and that added to the overall comfort performance. 

Dean also rated the simple-to-use lens release system, and the Ultra HD lens tested offered great visual clarity and no fogging. 100% also has an Ultra HD HiPER lens at extra cost which they say is designed to accentuate contrasts and highlight colors.   

For all the details and more, read our review of the 100% Armega goggles

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The lowdown: 100% Armega
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceNo fogging and great lens clarity★★★★
ComfortThe triple-layer foam makes them very comfy★★★★★
Colors and customizationA ton of color options★★★★★
Value for moneyCostly compared to others★★

7. Best budget

Giro Blok goggles

(Image credit: Dean Hersey)
Condensation cramps an otherwise comfortable goggle with classic styling

Specifications

Lens: Zeiss Vivid, clear

Reasons to buy

+
Great price
+
Classic subtle styling
+
Flexible frame eases lens swap
+
Comfortable face foam and shape
+
Large field of view

Reasons to avoid

-
Forlorn with fogging

The Giro Blok MTB goggles are packed with superb features and come in at a very wallet-friendly price point, and on test we found them to be a well-fitting and comfortable MTB goggles. The triple-layer face foam is soft and tapered, adding to the great fit and giving a comfortable seal.

With the goggle boasting a large number of vents all around, there were still some fogging and condensation issues, but its superb all-round performance means this is a negligible issue.

For more, read our full review of the Giro Blok MTB goggles.

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The lowdown: Giro Blok MTB
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceGenerally great but prone to condensation build up★★
ComfortFor the price decent levels of comfort★★★
Colors and customizationLimited, but comes with an extra clear lens
Value for moneyA budget offering does the job vs pricing well★★★★

8. Best customizable

Melon Diablo Goggles on a mossy rock

If you want to create your own almost create set of goggles, Melon's Diablos are the way to go (Image credit: James Blackwell)
Performance-focused MTB goggles with unique customizations

Specifications

Lens: Mirror, Iridium, Clear

Reasons to buy

+
Fully customizable
+
Super comfy
+
Great price
+
Good level of protection

Reasons to avoid

-
The frame is pretty flexible
-
Lens is not as good as pricier rivals

The Melon Diablo's big selling point is the ton of customization options on offer. Melon Optics allows for almost unlimited choice when it comes to the color of the strap, frame, outrigger, and frame. It means you're more than likely to have your very own unique and custom goggles. The customization isn't the only plus point as our test reviewer James Blackwell noted, "The Diablos also come with great performance and a decent budget price point."

Check out the full review of Melon Diablo Goggles.

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The lowdown: Melon Optics Diablo
AttributesNotesRating
PerformanceVent well and has a good lens★★★★
ComfortComfy with thick foam and great fit★★★★
Colors and customizationAn almost limitless choice★★★★★
Value for moneyFor the price, hard to beat★★★★

How we test the best MTB goggles

Our experts tested these MTB goggles out over several months in different light conditions and in various weathers. We have assessed their performance in a wide range of categories, including coverage, optical clarity, steaming/fogging, comfort, weight, durability, and cost.

Meet the testers

Jim Bland
Jim Bland

Jim Bland is a review and buyer's guide writer based in North Yorkshire, England. Jim’s chosen riding genre is hard to pinpoint and regularly varies from e-bike-assisted shuttle runs one day to cutting downcountry laps the next.

James Blackwell
James Blackwell

James, aka Jimmer, has 20 years experience working at MBUK, testing bikes and kit. He's ridden everything from XC to DH and knows a good performing mountain bike goggle when he sees one.

Dean Hersey
Dean Hersey

Dean is a freelance cycling journalist and a self-confessed pedal addict based in Dorset, who's fortunate to have the New Forest National Park and the Isle of Purbeck on his doorstep.

How to choose MTB goggles

Do you need goggles for mountain biking?

Not necessarily, however, if you are riding downhill and enduro it is recommended, as the best mountain bike goggles will provide significantly more eye protection than sunglasses. It's particularly beneficial to wear goggles in wet and muddy conditions as they will stop wheel-spray from going in your eyes and potentially causing a crash. 

While goggles are great for gravity sports, they aren't as good for cross-country. The extra face-covering means they can get warm if you are doing a long climb and don't have time to whip them off to stash in a bag or pocket at the bottom.

How much do goggles cost?

You get what you pay for, and goggles are no exception. There is a chasm in quality between a cheap set of goggles from a no-name brand and something from a well-known optical company. More expensive goggles will feature interchangeable lenses and straps, higher quality foam, and venting, and the lenses themselves may also have hydrophobic coatings and contrast-improving tints.

With that said, goggles take lots of abuse and lenses are going to get scratched, so it's important to weigh the above against the price.

How do you wear goggles on a mountain bike?

Goggles that don't interact well with your helmet or plug your nostrils because the nose bridge is too narrow are going to cause more problems than they solve. We recommend trying goggles on before you buy, and bringing your helmet with you to make sure everything works together. To assure a good fit, you want the strap to securely grip the rear of the helmet whilst not being overly tight on your face, as this will lead to discomfort and lens fogging.

Tunnel vision is the last thing you want bombing down narrow singletrack. When you try on a pair of goggles, take note if you can see the frame in your peripheral vision as this may affect your vision out on the trail.

What color lenses are best for mountain biking?

If you ride in sunny Southern California, a darker lens will leave you more comfortable, but if your trails snake through the trees with a dense overhead canopy, light or even a clear lens will be the go-to.

Lots of companies have their own versions of contrast-boosting technology, and they all work to varying degrees.

Depending on the lens, some brands will add hydrophobic and anti-fog coatings to their lenses, and these can be a godsend in wet weather or riding behind your roots-riding mate.

Can you replace goggle lenses?

Most brands offer interchangeable optics. The reality is your lenses are going to get scratched, and there is not a whole lot you can do about it. When you're shopping for goggles, have a look at how much spare lenses cost and factor that into potential costs.

Graham Cottingham
Senior reviews writer, Bike Perfect

Graham is all about riding bikes off-road. With almost 20 years of riding experience, he has dabbled in downhill, enduro, and gravel racing. Not afraid of a challenge, Graham has embraced bikepacking over the last few years and likes nothing more than strapping some bags to his bike and covering big miles to explore Scotland's wildernesses. When he isn’t shredding the gnar in the Tweed Valley, sleeping in bushes, or tinkering with bikes, he is writing tech reviews for Bike Perfect.

Rides: Cotic SolarisMax, Stooge MK4, 24 Bicycles Le Toy 3, Surly Steamroller

Height: 177cm

Weight: 71kg