Merida radically overhauls its e-MTB range with brand new eOne-Sixty and eOne-Forty models

The Merida eOne-Sixty 10K
(Image credit: Merida)

Merida overhauled and radicalized its One-Sixty and One-Forty trail/enduro bikes back in 2022. The brand has now applied much of the same progressive thinking to its fully redesigned range of electric mountain bikes – the eOne-Sixty and eOne-Forty.

The new eOne-Sixty range consists of five models (priced £5,500 / €6,600 to £10,500 / €12,600)  three carbon (called CF) and two aluminum (dubbed Lite), while the eOne-Forty gets two aluminum (Lite) base models (£4,300 / €5,150 to £5,200 / €6,250). For an extra £100 / €100 more, there are also two 'SUV' type eOneForty options that come set up with a rear rack, mounting points and fenders.

The Merida eOne-Sixty 10K seen from the front

The eOne-Sixty 10K is the fully loaded version and yes, all the models still get a front light (Image credit: Merida)

2024 Merida eOne-Sixty

When reviewing the latest conventionally powered One-Sixty and One-Forty models, we've been impressed – as has the MTB press across the board. So it makes total sense for Merida to bring the same concepts that made those bikes a success to its e-MTB range, which up until now was built for confident comfort rather than bombing enduro runs.

Both of the updated e-MTB models now utilize Merida's 'Agilometer' sizing system which, similar to Geometron Bikes, is based more on the length of the bike rather than the stature of the rider. As a result, sizing is now XShort, Short, Mid, Long and XLong, with as consistent seat and head tube lengths as possible across the range. This enables riders to pick an option based on their preferred reach rather than having that key metric dictated to them by other frame dimensions.

Merida eOne-Sixty geometry changes

Here you can see the geometry changes between the 2022 eOne-Sixty and the new 2024 incarnation (Image credit: Merida)

The geometry numbers have become more progressive across the board too. Reach is now longer than most in every size (XS – 419mm, S – 439mm, M – 459mm, L – 479mm, XL – 499mm), the head angle is slacker, the seat tube angle is steeper and the chainstays are longer (see diagram above).

Another significant change that worked well on Merida's latest conventional full-suspension bikes is the introduction of flexstays rather than a rear pivot. This is designed to make the bike easier to produce, maintain and sheds a little weight too. The frames have been certified with a Category 4, “All Mountain and Enduro“ rating and come with a lifetime guarantee for the original owner.

The e-bikes come as a mullet wheeled setup as standard, they also now get a flip-chip that allows owners to switch to twin 29-inch wheels without affecting the overall geometry of the bike. The frame also utilizes a UDH hanger which makes sourcing replacements straightforward and is compatible with SRAM's T-Type Transmission drivetrains.

Lite not light

The eOne-Sixty range has two different frames used across its five model ranges – the lighter 'CF' carbon version and the confusingly named, much heavier 'Lite' aluminum option. There's almost a 4kg difference in total bike between the lightest option – the carbon eOne-Sixty 10K (22.2kg size Mid) and the weightiest – the eOne-Sixty 875 (26.1kg), so the ride feel is going to be very different.

As you'd expect, the carbon models cost more and get a fancier kit, but as well as carbon being a lighter frame option than aluminum, a key reason for the big difference in weight is a bigger battery on the aluminum models. While the CF bikes get a non-removable 600Wh battery, the Lite versions get a drop-out 750Wh option. Having a fixed battery (well, it is removable, but you'd need to take the motor out first) helps save weight as the downtube doesn't need beefing up to accommodate having a big hole in it to drop the battery out.

Also slightly confusingly, despite the eOne-Sixty name, all the bikes get 170mm of suspension travel up front and 174mm at the rear.

Here's the full model range...

  • eOne-Sixty 10k (CF) –  £10,500 / €12,600
  • eOne-Sixty 7000 (CF) – £7,000 / €8,400
  • eOne-Sixty 6000 (CF) – £6,000 / €7,200
  • eOne-Sixty 875 (Lite) – £6,000 / €7,200
  • eOne-Sixty 675 (Lite) – £5,500 / €6,600

The Merida eOne-Forty 400

The most affordable bike in the new range – the eOne-Forty 400 (Image credit: Merida)

2024 Merida eOne-Forty

While the eOne-Forty gets the same mainframe as its longer travel stablemate, the back end has pivots rather than the flexstays. Merida says that this is due to the less radical riding a shorter travel bike is likely to do, though the purely human-powered One-Forty models do have flexstays.

Rather than coming with a mullet-wheeled set-up like its longer travel sibling, the eOne-Forty has 29-inch wheels at both ends. If you fancy running a mullet though, the frame has the same geo-adjusting flip-chip as the One-Sixty.

Suspension-wise, the eOne-Forty bikes get a 150mm travel fork up front with 143mm of travel at the rear. Despite being shorter travel, weights are virtually the same as the Lite (not light) eOne-Sixtys at 26kg.

The Merida eOne-Forty with a pannier rack

The eOne-Forty in its SUV style EQ option (Image credit: Merida)

While the eOne-Forty range consists of three base models – the 675, 475 and 400, it also has two EQ options that come with a rear rack, mounts and mudguards if you want a fully loaded, all-terrain SUV type e-bike.

Here's the five models...

  • eOne-Forty 675 (Lite) –  £5,200 / €6,250
  • eOne-Forty 675 EQ (Lite) –  £5,300 / €6,350
  • eOne-Forty 475 (Lite) –  £4,850 / €5,800
  • eOne-Forty 475 EQ (Lite) –  £4,950 / €5,900
  • eOne-Forty 400 EQ (Lite) –  £4,300 / €5,150

The Lite aluminum models of both the eOne-Sixty and eOne-Forty should be available from late March, followed by the CF eOne-Sixty versions sometime in April. The full range is available across Europe, UK and Eire, while Australia gets selected models. Merida bikes are not available in the US.

For more info, I've written a first ride review on the 2024 Merida eOne-Sixty 675, or you can head to merida-bikes.com.

The Merida eOne-Sixty 10K

The 10K edition leads the eOne-Sixty line up (Image credit: Merida)

2024 Merida eOne-Sixty 10K (CF)

  • Price: $NA / £10,500 / €12,600
  • Available from: April 2024
  • Frame: Carbon, 174mm travel, Boost width
  • Fork: Fox 38 Factory eMTB+, 170mm
  • Shock: Fox Float X2 Factory
  • Motor: Shimano EP801
  • Battery: Trendpower 750Wh, plus optional 360Wh range extender
  • Reach: XS – 419, S – 439, M – 459, L – 479, XL – 499mm
  • Head tube angle: 64.4 degrees
  • Seat tube angle: 78.5 degrees
  • Gears: SRAM T-Type Transmission AXS XX
  • Crankset: Shimano FC-EN900, 165mm
  • Brakes: SRAM Code Ultimate Stealth, 4 piston, rotors – 220mm front, 203mm rear
  • Wheels: DT Swiss Spline HXC1501 spline 30, Boost width hubs
  • Tires: Maxxis Assegai 29x2.5, TR EXO+ 3C MaxxGrip front, DHR II 27.5x2.4, 3C DD MaxxTerra rear
  • Dropper: Merida Team TR II, 34.9mm diameter, adjustable travel 30-230 mm
  • Saddle: PROXIM W400 T2.0, V-mount adapter, incl. MERIDA minitool
  • Sizing: XShort, Short, Mid, Long, XLong
  • Weight: 22.2kg (claimed size Mid)

The Merida eOne-Sixty 875

The Merida eOne-Sixty 875 is the fanciest aluminum framed model in the range (Image credit: Merida)

2024 Merida eOne-Sixty 875 (Lite)

  • Price: $NA / £6,000 / €7,200
  • Available from: Late March 2024
  • Frame: Aluminum, 174mm travel, Boost width
  • Fork: RockShox Zeb Select, 170mm
  • Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select
  • Motor: Shimano EP801
  • Battery: Trendpower 750Wh, plus optional 360Wh range extender
  • Reach: XS – 419, S – 439, M – 459, L – 479, XL – 499mm
  • Head tube angle: 64.4 degrees
  • Seat tube angle: 78.5 degrees
  • Gears: Shimano XT M8130 1x12
  • Crankset: Shimano FC-E8150, 165mm
  • Brakes: Shimano XT, 4 piston, rotors – 220mm front, 203mm rear
  • Wheels: Merida Expert TR II 28mm inner width rims on Shimano XT Boost width hubs
  • Tires: Maxxis Assegai 29x2.5, TR EXO+ 3C MaxxGrip front, DHR II 27.5x2.4, 3C DD MaxxTerra rear
  • Dropper: Merida Team TR II, 34.9mm diameter, adjustable travel 30-230 mm
  • Saddle: PROXIM W400 STN, incl. MERIDA minitool
  • Sizing: XShort, Short, Mid, Long, XLong
  • Weight: 26.1kg (claimed size Mid)

The Merida eOne-Forty 675

The 675 model tops the eOne-Forty range (Image credit: Merida)

2024 Merida eOne-Forty 675 (Lite)

  • Price: $NA / £5,200 / €6,250
  • Available from: Late March 2024
  • Frame: Aluminum, 143mm travel, Boost width
  • Fork: SR Suntour AION X 36, 150mm
  • Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select
  • Motor: Shimano EP801
  • Battery: Trendpower 750Wh, plus optional 360Wh range extender
  • Reach: XS – 431, S – 451, M – 471, L – 491, XL – 511mm
  • Head tube angle: 66.5 degrees
  • Seat tube angle: 79.7 degrees
  • Gears: SRAM NX Eagle 1x12
  • Crankset: Shimano FC-E8150, 165mm
  • Brakes: Shimano XT, 4 piston, rotors – 220mm front, 203mm rear
  • Wheels: Merida Expert TR II 28mm inner width rims on Novatec SL-TEAM Boost width hubs
  • Tires: Maxxis Rekon, 2.4, 3C EXO MaxxTerra
  • Dropper: Merida Expert TR II, XS: 125 mm travel, S: 150 mm travel, - M/L/XL: 200 mm travel
  • Saddle: Merida SL, V-mount with mini-tool
  • Sizing: XShort, Short, Mid, Long, XLong
  • Weight: 26 kg (claimed size Mid)
Richard Owen
Editor, Bike Perfect

Rich has been riding mountain bikes for over 30 years and mostly likes hitting flowy yet technical trails that point downhill. A jack of many trades, he has competed in cross-country, enduro and long distance MTB races. A resident of North Devon, Rich can mostly be found pedaling furiously around his local trails, or slightly further afield in the Quantocks, the Mendips or Exmoor. 


Current rides: Merida One-Forty 6000, Banshee Paradox

Height: 175cm

Weight: 68kg